reviews

A Different Kind Of Review

The Underground: Second Edition, just received another 5-star review. But this one was different. The reviewer, instead of focusing on the writing, the plot, and the characters, focused on the story itself. Her observations were insightful. What I’m especially pleased with is that she said, point blank, “you’ll either love it or hate it” depending on whether a reader can “meld” with my world, and accept that there’s something “strangely different” about the characters–not to mention the profanity, violence and graphic erotic content. I feel a sense of relief that someone is telling readers that this book is not for everyone. This is what I tried to do with my warning in the description. In short, if you don’t think you can handle it, move along, move along. I don’t want any one and two-star reviews because the reader couldn’t take it.

I’m also running a Goodreads giveaway. Why I keep going back into that shark pit, I don’t know. But I find it interesting that after this review went online, giveaway entries shot up. I’m sure it’s because the review has piqued readers’ curiosity about the book. Speaking of reviews, I’m trawling for them on The Indie Reader. Mostly for The Moreva of Astoreth, because, well, I don’t think most of these reviewers are ready for The Underground: Second Edition. Only one reviewer so far has asked for it. I hate chasing reviews. It’s so tedious. But it must be done.

I’m also entering both books into a contest.… Continue reading

Should Authors Pay For Reviews?

Whether authors should pay for reviews is an ongoing debate.

First, we have to acknowledge that there are two types of reviews: editorial reviews, and reader reviews. Editorial reviews–like those from Kirkus, Clarion and others–are paid reviews. They are not cheap, either. These are the reviews that you might see on an Amazon page, under editorial reviews. Of course, not all editorial reviews cost. Midwest Book Review, for example, does not charge for reviews. Your book also might not get reviewed, either. So if you really, really want an editorial review, chances are you’re going to have to pay for it. Nobody seems to have a problem with that.

It’s the reader reviews that causes such angst. There is the camp that is philosophically opposed to paid reader reviews. It cheapens the review process, they say. Paid reader reviews lose integrity. Money taints the review because it’s an incentive to give a good one, rather than an honest one. The other camp says that readers should be paid for reviews. After all, they’re giving their opinion, just like a lawyer would to his client. Ah, the first camp says, but that’s different. In that case, you’re paying for the opinion of a professional. Readers are not professionals; they review books because they love to read. But isn’t giving a reviewer a free book a form of payment? It certainly costs the author to provide a copy. Or is this more of a barter system: If you agree to review my… Continue reading

Step One

Spent almost the last 24 hours looking up reviewers for The Moreva of Astoreth. There’s a website called “Indie View” and it lists prolific reviewers who either specifically or are willing to review indie books. There are a lot of them–about three hundred, listed from A to Z. So it takes a while to sift through them.

The good news, though, is that many of them review science fiction and romance. Since mine is a bit of both, I sent off a query. I’ve already had two responses, which kind of surprised me, considering how many requests they must get. Anyway, I’ve no idea how many queries I sent off and to whom. It didn’t occur to me to write it down as I was going along until after I’d finished. Not good business sense on my part, but I’m still learning.

Now, it’s on to Step Two.

Later, gators!

 

A New Addition to the Family

Yes, yes–I haven’t been around much lately. But that’s because I’ve been so busy birthing The Moreva of Astoreth. And I’m happy to say I’m now the proud Mama of a brand new book! TMOA went live on Smashwords on November 1, 2015. Since then, I’ve been working hard to get it into other distribution channels. It’s available on Amazon in both print and e-book form. It’s available on Kobo, and will soon be available on Nook as well. I’m keeping my eye out for other distribution channels (I’m working on Ingram right now) and when I find ’em, I’ll put ‘er up.

As with any kid, once you have one, you have to raise it. That means looking for opportunities to market your work. And there are lots of ways you can do that, many without leaving the comfort of your desktop. But it’s not necessarily easy. Book reviewers are flooded with authors clamoring for them to review their work. Some require payment (which is not always feasible if you’re on a budget). Personally, I don’t  think there’s anything wrong with paying for a review, as long as it’s an honest one. And face it, the big publishing houses have long-standing relationships with outfits like Kirkus and Publisher’s Weekly, so the chance of an indie getting into their main review magazines is well-nigh impossible. Kirkus will publish a review for a price–and like I said, nothing wrong with that–but the price is steep. That’s really my only beef with… Continue reading